Summer 2019 SMPA Courses


Graduate Courses »
 

Introduction to Newswriting and Reporting (SMPA 2110W). Taught by Myron Belkind.

Fundamentals of news reporting and writing, with emphasis on the print media. News judgment, information gathering skills, and crafting news and feature stories. Regular in-class and outside reporting and writing exercises. Directly admitted freshmen may enroll in their second semester; all other freshmen need departmental permission. (Open to non-majors: WID credit).

Digital Media I: Introduction to Video Production (SMPA 2112). Taught by Jason Osder.

Foundational introduction to digital media production. Videography and non-linear editing, with emphasis on use in journalism and political communication. Laboratory fee. Restricted to students in the political communication and journalism and mass communication programs. Open only to SMPA majors.

Digital Media II: Introduction to Web Production and Social Media (SMPA 2113 ). Taught by Imani M. Cheers.

Foundational introduction to digital media production. Web content and design; photography and audio applied to the web; and using social media. Emphasis on use in journalism and political communication. Laboratory fee. Restricted to Political Communication and Journalism & Mass Communication majors only.

Screenwriting for Social Justice (SMPA 3194 & 3195). Taught by Kerric Harvey. 

Science Journalism examines current trends and challenges in communicating science developments through mass media. Classic and modern techniques for explaining complexity to the public will be explored, as will tensions in the triangular relationship between scientists, journalists and audiences. This is not a craft or skills course. Emphasis is on understanding historic and contemporary conflicts between scientific findings and personal beliefs in areas where scientific data and projections are challenged. We will investigate the challenges of communicating complex issues, considering major areas of scientific investigation, communication techniques and social conditions that affect critical thinking and scientific literacy. Discussion will focus on successful methods of communicating science, with emphasis on the rise of digital information delivery.

Entrepreneurship in New Media Industry (SMPA 3195.80). Taught by Richard Ducey.

Decades-old media business models are being upended by changing audience and advertiser patterns across traditional and digital media; Internet technologies supporting innovative, scalable and engaged user services; and challenging economics on who pays for content. Based on a grounded understanding of the digital media ecosystem, we will analyze what is happening; why; where the media industry is headed and career opportunities for those entering this industry. We will explore the role of entrepreneurship in a period of fast change and the degree to which this is accepted in the market and institutionalized by the financial, policy and media communities. We will consider how traditional media companies try to evolve and evaluate their relative success in doing so by identifying critical change factors. Each student will prepare their own entrepreneurial business plan. Open only to juniors and seniors.

Independent Study (SMPA 3196.10).

Internship (SMPA 3197.10).

Social Media (SMPA 3450). Taught by Nikki Usher. 

Practical and theoretical implications of social media; what it means to be social and how social media has changed how individuals interact and do business; birth and history of social media and why certain forms of social media flourish while others fail.

 

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GRADUATE COURSES

Documentary Filmmaking (SMPA 6231 - multiple sections). Taught by Nina Seavey and Sam Sheline. 

Analytical and practical exploration of the elements of documentary filmmaking. The genres of nonfiction filmmaking; fundamentals of film conceptualization, documentary screenwriting, story structure, and production theory; and basic practical elements of production. Admission by permission of instructor.

Social Media  (SMPA 6270). Taught by Nikki Usher. 

Practical and theoretical implications of social media; what it means to be social and how social media has changed how individuals interact and do business; birth and history of social media and why certain forms of social media flourish while others fail.

Directed Readings and Research (SMPA 6296). Independent research with SMPA faculty member. Must be approved in advance by supervising professor and director of graduate studies

Capstone Project (SMPA 6297.10 and 6298.10) 

Thesis Research (SMPA 6998.10 and 6999.10)

 

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